Announcing: Three live Python courses

If you’re like many of the Python developers I know, the basics are easy for you: Strings, lists, tuples, dictionaries, functions, and even objects roll off of your fingers and onto your keyboard. Your day-to-day tasks have become significantly easier as a result of Python, and you’re comfortable using it for tasks at work and home.

But some parts of Python remain difficult, mysterious, and outside of your comfort zone:

  • When you want to use a list comprehension, you have to go to Stack Overflow to remember how they work — to say nothing of set and dict comprehensions.
  • You know that there is a difference between functions and methods, but you can’t quite put your foot on what that difference is, or how Python rewrites “self” to be the first argument to every method.
  • You keep hearing about “decorators,” and how they allow you to do all sorts of magical things to functions and classes — but every time you start reading about them, you get confused or distracted.

Sound familiar? If so, then I want to help.

As you probably know, I spend just about every day at one of the world’s best companies — Apple, Cisco, IBM, PayPal, VMWare, and Western Digital, among others — teaching their engineers how to use Python.

The engineers who learn these techniques benefit by having more “tools in their toolbox,” as I like to put it; when a problem presents itself, they have more options at their disposal. I help them to solve new types of problems, or to solve existing problems more quickly. These engineers become more valuable to their employers, and more valuable on the larger job market.

I’m announcing three courses that you can take, from the comfort of your home or office, using the content I’ve presented to these companies:

  • Tuesday, July 25: Functional programming in Python
    • comprehensions
    • custom sorting
    • passing functions as arguments
    • lambda expressions
    • map, filter, and reduce
  • Wednesday, August 2: Advanced Python objects
    • attributes
    • methods vs. functions
    • class attributes
    • inheritance
    • methods vs. functions
    • descriptors
    • dunder methods
  • Thursday, August 3: Python decorators
    • properties and other built-in decorators
    • writing decorators
    • decorating functions, objects, and methods

Each of these classes will run live, for five hours (with two 15-minute breaks):

  • New York: 7 a.m. – 2 p.m.
  • London: 12 noon – 5 p.m.
  • Israel: 2 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Mumbai: 5:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.

Each will be packed with lectures, accompanied by tons of live-coding examples, many exercises that you’ll be expected to solve (and which we’ll review together when you’re done), and plenty of time for interactions and questions.  Indeed, please come with lots of questions, to make the class more interesting and relevant.

Each course costs $350, and will give you:

  • Access to the live audio/video/chat feed,
  • PDFs of my slides,
  • the Jupyter notebook I use during my live-coding demos,
  • and solutions to all of the exercises

I’m offering discounts to people who buy more than one course:

  • Buy two courses, and save $100, for a total of $600.  Just use the “2sessions” coupon code when purchasing each one.
  • Buy all three courses, and save $250, for a total of $800.  Just use the “3sessions” coupon code when purchasing each one.

As always, I’m also offering a discount to students; e-mail me, and I’ll send you the appropriate discount code.

Convinced?  I hope so!  View the full course descriptions here, and then register for them:

But wait!  If you register before Monday, July 18th, then you can save 15% more, by purchasing an early-bird ticket.

I’m very excited to be offering these courses.  They won’t be my last ones — but I’ll next be teaching other topics, so if these subjects interest you, you should definitely attend.

I hope that you can join me for these live, online courses.

2 thoughts on “Announcing: Three live Python courses”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

58 − = forty eight