Announcing: Coaching for technical trainers

What, exactly, do I do for a living?

Yes, I’m a programmer — or as I’m supposed to say nowadays, a “full-stack Web developer.” And yes, I’m a lead developer/CTO.  And yes, I’m a writer, with two ebooks written (about Python and visiting China), two more on the way, and my monthly Linux Journal column now in its 20th (!) year.

But over the last few years, another role has increasingly dominated the others: Much of my time is now spent as a technical trainer, teaching a variety of open-source technologies — Python, Ruby, Git, and PostgreSQL — to companies around the world.

Some software developers believe that training is less demanding, less fulfilling, or even less lucrative than creating software. And for some of them, that might well be true.

I have personally found training to be no less demanding than developing software — but I have also found that it is extremely fulfilling, and that it does a more-than-adequate job of paying the bills. We all know that high-tech companies are desperately looking for high-quality developers; when I do my job right, I provide them with such developers, ready to use the latest technologies to solve problems more efficiently and reliably than would otherwise have been possible.

The good news is that my training business is going quite well; I’m now booked solid for several months in advance, and I get to work with some great companies and very bright engineers. Part of my motivation for writing ebooks is now to reach the people whom I cannot possibly teach in person.

Being a trainer requires a number of skills beyond knowing how to program: You also need to know how to organize a syllabus, prepare exercises, prepare slides and printed materials, speak in front of a group, and answer questions. Beyond that, you also need to understand the business side of training — what are companies looking for, how do you approach them, how much do you charge them, and how can you grow your training business when companies are satisfied with your work. These skills, like many others, take time develop, and everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses. But I believe that if you’re willing to put in the effort, then you can learn how to become a technical trainer, and have the same sense of job satisfaction that I do.

If you are such a person, interested in offering technical training — on any subject, not just the technologies in which I specialize — then I invite you to consider joining my coaching program for technical trainers. This isn’t a course; it’s a personalized program that will help you to improve, month by month, in all of the ways that you need to become successful. You’ll have access not just to me, but to other trainers with varying levels of experience, who will provide you with feedback — just as I hope you’ll help them. The program is still in its infancy, but I believe that I’ve put together a combination of resources that can help everyone to become a trainer.

I’m launching the coaching program in two weeks, on October 1st, 2015. There aren’t any formal start of finish times; if you want to start later, then that’s fine, as well. My hope is that you’ll stay in the program for as long as you need to improve, getting feedback from me and others.  I also hope and expect that the program will more than pay for itself.

I’ll be holding a free Webinar on the subject of technical training on October 14th, at which I’ll also be taking questions from anyone who might be new to this field, or be curious about what it involves. I invite you to read more about my coaching program, to contact me if you have any questions about it, and to register for the Webinar that I’ll be holding next month!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

sixty ÷ six =